Reflection: Living with Imperfections

Following beauty bloggers is a great way to keep up with the beauty community, be advised of the latest releases and to learn ways on how to be more stylish and put together.

As the blogging industry and indeed the beauty industry seems to be so competitive and evolving, it's hard to keep up.  Sometimes it's easy to feel slightly on the frumpy side, certainly not as glamorous as those we follow and also to feel more hung-up on the imperfections we feel we have.

As the old cliche goes 'no-one's perfect'.

It's easy to get lost in perfectly formed Instagram feeds and feel a hint of jealously, reading slick travel posts and dreaming of lying on an exotic beach.  But how much of it is really 'real life'? And why do we get so hung-up on small imperfections?

I don't know about you, but there are things I would love to change about myself.  Or at least I think there are. I'm not quite sure if it would make me any happier if I did. The blemishes and scars tell a story, they're part of me. And your scars, part of you.

I have a massive scar on my right knee.  Being a clumsy child (and adult) and being heavy on my feet, I fell awkwardly, the wound didn't heal and weeks later I fell on the same knee. My scar could be classed as unsightly, however it's not much bigger than a 50p piece. Now technology has evolved, I'm sure you could spend hundreds of pounds and hours to somehow repair/laser away the scar at some top London clinic. I used to be so self conscious of my knee and would wear thick 'tan' tights in 30 degree heat to cover it up.  Not now, it's just a small scar, which quite honestly no-one else would notice if I didn't mention.

At the top of my right arm also lives a scar from where I had a flat mole removed. being fair and prone to burning, I especially worry about the dangers of the sun. Lovely, as it is to bake under its hot rays, I don't want to burn and try to protect my skin as much as possible. At the time of removal, I had no concerns over my mole. It was the size of a 5p piece and fairly unobtrusive. For safety's sake, I saw no real reason not to get this removed. A quick 5 minute procedure at the local doctors and it was gone.  Overtime it's healed to another scar.

Reflection: Living with Imperfections

I have a small indentation on my nose, where I picked a particular nasty, hormonal spot as a teenager and the skin never quite recovered. Other than that my skin is good and clear.  If I had just left it alone, the spot would have healed and and it would be easier to apply foundation to this area.  Any foundation seems to sink into the mark on application making it more prominent.

For years, I had a brace to close the gap between my two top front teeth.  Luckily my teeth are fairly straight and shiny and bright. The gap closed significantly and still exists slightly. It's small though and just adds character to my cheeky smile.  The dentist at the time told me I'd marry someone rich. This is yet to happen!

I have stretch marks on my tummy, from where I have lost weight, gained and lost again. I am missing my big toenails due to ingrowing toe nails from years ago.  No-one looks at my feet. They get me around and I try my best to look after them. Often painted in nude or neutral colours, I would never sport a neon or bright nail in the summer as this would draw too much attention to my loss.

I have a little cellulite and I have freckles (which I now love).

What I am trying to say, is you can post a hundred or more Instagram pictures to your feed all looking perfect, using editing tools and filters.  We can all moan about tiny insignificant details, compare ourselves to others or desire things others have.  As long as we and the people we love around us are happy and healthy, what is there to complain about?

The flaws just add to us as people and tell a life story.  So next time you worry about that acne scar, cellulite or other lumps and bumps you may have, tell yourself, it's part of you.

Everyone has flaws, so smile and carry on with your day. Embrace it. It makes you, you.

There's always someone much worse off.